Talk:Igbo people

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Good articleIgbo people has been listed as one of the Social sciences and society good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
November 21, 2008Good article nomineeNot listed
December 5, 2008Peer reviewReviewed
January 11, 2009Good article nomineeListed
January 17, 2009Peer reviewReviewed
January 31, 2009Featured article candidateNot promoted
May 13, 2009Peer reviewReviewed
March 25, 2010Peer reviewReviewed
Current status: Good article

First book about the Igbo language in the West Indies (1777)[edit]

The correct German title of the book of G.C.A. Oldendorp (published 1777) is: "Geschichte der Mission der evangelischen Brüder auf den caraibischen Inseln St. Thomas, St. Croix und S. Jan", in English: "History of the Mission of the Evangelic Brothers on the Caribean Islands St. Thomas, St. Croix and S. Jan" (found by Google) --Tfjt (talk) 18:21, 6 September 2010 (UTC)[reply]

Do you have the source? Is it reliable? Ukabia - talk 18:39, 20 October 2010 (UTC)[reply]
Look here: Jorge A. Santiago-Blay: Medical Importance of Scorpions in Puerto Rico: A Preliminary Survey, page 316, Literature cited.[1]. Greetings from Düsseldorf, Germany --Tfjt (talk) 20:07, 30 October 2010 (UTC)[reply]
Okay, I've corrected it. Thanks! Ukabia - talk 21:15, 30 October 2010 (UTC)[reply]

I doubt, Herodotus wrote about the people as well as their activities in Greece,I think that should be older, many literary works talks about the Igbo nation. Christian Ngozi (talk) 10:07, 21 September 2019 (UTC)[reply]

Igbo tribes[edit]

The Igbo had no supra-tribal govt at the beginning of the colonial people, but we do not list the Igbo tribes. Which were the primary units of tribal identity then, and which do people identify with today? — kwami (talk) 09:35, 30 January 2011 (UTC)[reply]

I have known people who identified themselves as "Ibo", but have never met anyone who self-identified as "Igbo". I am not trying to introduce contention, but I suspect that there is some story behind this, and that it may deserve mention in the article. I see that a number of people claim that "Ibo" is a colonial mispronunciation of "Igbo", but nobody seems to have bothered to trace it's origin, or explain why the linguistic classification is always "Igbo", even when "Ibo" is used to refer to a people. This seems a likely area for research.

Your Y chromosome is not your ethnicity[edit]

People who do not understand population genetics should not be allowed to talk about "Igbo chromosomes". There are people in England who know of no other ancestors than Englishmen who show up with "Igbo Y chromosomes". There are just very few of them. That's population genetics, and this is unrelated to ethnic identity.

People who try to construct ethnic origins based on classification of their Y and mt-DNA are just on an ego-trip to build their private narrative about "roots", and this isn't notable outside of their respective biography articles.

Genetics are just a very, very small part of the concept of "ethnicity", and the Y-haplogroup is just a very, very, very small part of the field of "genetics".

Like any other ethnicity, Igbo people are those who participate in Igbo culture and tradition. Most of them are in Nigeria, a few of them are scattered as part of the Nigerian diaspora. --dab (𒁳) 10:17, 12 September 2012 (UTC)[reply]

Years needed in first footnote[edit]

I've been trying to find the years for the sources mentioned in the current first footnote that talks about Igbo population. The Nzewi book referred to is the following:

Nzewi, Meki (1997). African music : theoretical content and creative continuum : the culture-exponent's definitions. Olderhausen: Institut für Didaktik populärer Musik. ISBN 9783930915798.

I'm not sure what the Mushanga reference is. Maybe this? I'm waiting for it from library reserve to confirm... Ender and Peter 01:39, 3 July 2013 (UTC)[reply]

So, it was definitely not that Mushanga book because I checked it out and on page 166 is an article written in French that doesn't mention the figure "20 million" or "20 millions" anywhere. Unless someone can find this "Mushanga" source, I'm going to delete that part. Ender and Peter 17:54, 5 July 2013 (UTC)[reply]

Ibo[edit]

I'd be fine with using Igbo as the more correct name even if it weren't now the more common one (which it is) but this historical importance of the name Ibo necessitates including and bolding it in the lead, not burying it in a list with names like Heebo in the middle of the article. — LlywelynII 04:34, 23 April 2014 (UTC)[reply]

pronunciation[edit]

My impression, which could be totally wrong, is that the name of this people is usually spelled "Igbo" in English, but the "g" is regarded as silent in spoken English, so it's pronounced /ˈibo/ in English. If this is correct, it would be good if we can give readers some guidance about the pronunciation, so they don't go around saying /ˈɪɡbo/ and getting laughed about by their friends. – Greg Pandatshang (talk) 22:21, 16 October 2015 (UTC)[reply]

The /gb/ sound is a digraph which is very different from any English sound. In English, /ibo/ sounds better than /igbo/. The actual word 'igbo' and other words containing digraphs are generally difficult for people outside West Africa. TEK1 (talk) 17:11, 27 November 2019 (UTC)[reply]

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Genetics for ethnic groups RfC[edit]

For editors interested, there's an RfC currently being held: Should sections on genetics be removed from pages on ethnic groups?. As this will almost certainly result in the removal of the "genetics" section from this article, I'd encourage any contributors to voice their opinions there. --Katangais (talk) 20:04, 30 April 2016 (UTC)[reply]

Controversial edits[edit]

@ChiefPrinceAndDuke: Can you please explain what you're trying to achieve with your contributions to this article. You changed population figures from 34 to 55 million, without any verifiable source to back that up. You added "erroneously" to the alternative form of Igbo (which is verifiable, based on a high number of sources who use the name), which is pretty much a [[WP:NPOV|non-neutral adjective). You removed information about subgroups who dispute the Igbo Identity, even though they are backed by verifiable sources. What exactly are you doing?--Jamie Tubers (talk) 02:30, 4 October 2016 (UTC)[reply]

I did not change the population figures to 55 million. You can check the page history before making unnecessary accusations. Secondly, Ibo is an adulteration of the term "Igbo" and it is a verifiable fact. That many people use it does not make it correct. I don't even understand why you consider the Igbo Jews as a distinct ethnic group. Do you even know what an ethnic group is? Igbo Jews are merely people of Igbo extraction who practice a form of Judaism. Then again, since a large number of the Ekpeye subgroup believe that the are Igbo, whilst some others believe they are not, to avoid controversy and for neutrality and impartiality, isn't it better leaving them out of the list entirely? You asked me what I'm trying to achieve? I'm trying to correct misinformation, because billions of people the world over depend on Wikipedia to make sense of the world around them. Now my question is, why did you remove Asaba and Port Harcourt from the list of major Igbo towns and cities? ChiefPrinceAndDuke (talk) 07:43, 4 October 2016 (UTC)[reply]

  • What I'm concerned about is, the population figure and the "erroneous" you kept adding. Like I said in one of the edit summaries, explanations on how a word came about is not included in the lead. For example, "Eko is a corruption of the word, "Oko", but you don't see the explanation in the lead, but rather in the Etymology section. That's how it is done per WP:MOS. Wikipedia works based on guidelines, not what you think is right.
Also, I wasn't the one who added the subgroups with disputed identities, but the citations, next to the claims confirm the claims; a quick google search also confirms the dispute, that's the reason I kept reverting your edits, because it isn't following the Wikipedia's guideline of Neutrality.
@Ochmany: can you kindly provide reference to the statistics you're adding about the populations.--Jamie Tubers (talk) 13:20, 7 October 2016 (UTC)[reply]

You keep making that mistake. I did not add those population figures. I do not add what cannot be satisfactorily verified. ChiefPrinceAndDuke (talk) 16:30, 7 October 2016 (UTC)[reply]

  • But you're adding an information in the wrong section. Check out other articles, and check the sections where explanations of their words are given.--Jamie Tubers (talk) 14:09, 9 October 2016 (UTC)[reply]

Disruptive Editing[edit]

@Jamie Tubers: Why do you keep on editing this page, resisting new information and smuggling controversial statements without verifiable sources? You claimed that many Anioma do not consider themselves Igbo without backing it up with a verifiable source? You repeatedly removed a line information the reader why the pronunciation "Ibo" is erroneous though it has a verifiable source right next to it. If only you had bothered to open that link. Having gone through your edits on this page, I have just discovered how glaring your partiality and bias is. I have always maintained that Wikipedia is not an avenue for advancing personal opinion, hearsays and agenda. If you desire a platform where your personal opinion is the gospel, I recommend that you create a blog. ChiefPrinceAndDuke (talk) 08:01, 4 October 2016 (UTC)[reply]

How are Igbos related to Ibibio, efik, ogoni etc[edit]

How are Igbos related to groups like the Ogoni and Ibibio? They live close to each other but what is the relation to each other? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ibua (talkcontribs) 17:56, 26 December 2016 (UTC)[reply]

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"Ṇ́dị́ Ìgbò"[edit]

What is the reference for this spelling? Not even Igbo language is aware that Igbo should be spelled Ìgbò. I with grave (Ì) is not part of the Pan-Nigerian alphabet. The Igbo language page references "The current Ọ́nwụ́ (/oŋwu/) alphabet, a compromise between the older Lepsius alphabet and a newer alphabet advocated by the International Institute of African Languages and Cultures (IIALC), was agreed to in 1962." Are we using this? Or is "Ṇ́dị́ Ìgbò" an example of IIALC spelling? Why would you even impose this on the article without citing a reference? The diacritics are useless if we aren't told whose orthography we are looking at. --dab (𒁳) 09:33, 20 April 2017 (UTC)[reply]

I now understand these indicate (low?) tone. According to Igbo language, "tone is not normally written". Not sure if we need it here, especially as it took me ages to find out what it meant. Reference the spelling, and then add a footnote explaining what we are looking at. --dab (𒁳) 12:31, 20 April 2017 (UTC)[reply]

Semi-protected edit request on 7 May 2017[edit]

Organization is spelled incorrectly 2601:183:8480:3E29:951B:CEFB:8831:7F0A (talk) 22:00, 7 May 2017 (UTC)[reply]

Not done: As per the notice at the top of this talk page, this article is written in American English. — IVORK Discuss 03:12, 8 May 2017 (UTC)[reply]

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Semi-protected edit request on 24 December 2017[edit]

Add that similarly Bahamians also use "yinna" to refer to "you all" near the mention of Jamaican's use of "unu". 2601:154:8000:104:30AA:B5BE:B0DB:2189 (talk) 01:01, 24 December 2017 (UTC)[reply]

Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. Upsidedown Keyboard (talk) 02:43, 24 December 2017 (UTC)[reply]

Gender and Igbo Culture[edit]

I added a tidbit of information to the culture section of the article about traditional constructs of gender. Please feel free to correct, revise, and add to this information because I feel that it needs more attention. Thanks! — Preceding unsigned comment added by Winchell97 (talkcontribs) 04:59, 12 November 2018 (UTC)[reply]

Nomination of Portal:Igbo people for deletion[edit]

A discussion is taking place as to whether Portal:Igbo people is suitable for inclusion in Wikipedia according to Wikipedia's policies and guidelines or whether it should be deleted.

The page will be discussed at Wikipedia:Miscellany for deletion/Portal:Igbo people until a consensus is reached, and anyone is welcome to contribute to the discussion. The nomination will explain the policies and guidelines which are of concern. The discussion focuses on high-quality evidence and our policies and guidelines.

Users may edit the page during the discussion, including to improve the page to address concerns raised in the discussion. However, do not remove the deletion notice from the top of the page. North America1000 17:23, 28 May 2019 (UTC)[reply]

The Igbo Early chiefs[edit]

The Igbo people of southern Nigeria were at a time led by Nubian chief's who retained the title to their names, the practice was observed among the southern Igbo groups. For instance, the Arochukwu Legend known as "Eze Agwu" maintained a Nubian title to his name, however, he was called "Inubia Agwu" likewise other Nubian chiefs who lived among the Akpa caves shared a variant title known as "Nubi", however examples include "Nubi Osim" or "Nubi Akuma," though, both names appear to be Igbo names with Nubian titles. The two Nubian titles observed were "Nubi and Inubia" but in reality its the same title but varied due to differences in dialect, for instance among the southern Igbo groups the word for a leader or chief is "Ezeyi" or "Eze" , there could many more variance observed depending on the dialect of the speaker. The early chiefs exercised executive authority over their districts or clans, which could include the creating policy frameworks for trade, commerce and development in the society. They also organised the various units of the political structure which is the okpara system also referred to as government Ndi Okpu. The local executive chiefs is also responsible for protecting the masses, training the young and preparing them for war if necessary. The Igbo nation had no executive kings, because the political structure was not established based on hereditary, rather it was a republican system and could not have been a kingdom, the best among the men leads the people. Achievement and merit were key instruments used to select Chiefs into their varying localities. After the Nubian chiefs settled, certain group of priest kings began to surface for instance Njoku in southern Igbo groups and Nri among the northern Igbo society, several others emerged at competitive rates. These priest kings engaged into religious services and later influenced the establishment of city states explaining the various dimensions of Chukwu to sorrunding ethnic groupd, which influenced the development of markets in Ife, Ogiso, Idah, Aro, Ewe etc. These religious chiefs became a part of their host community and lead them well. The various Igbo thoughts about God shared abroad is Ose-na-buwa(Osebuluwa), Oghene(Oghini), Oricha(Olisa), Obasi(Obashi) which was received as Osenobua, Oghene, Orisha and Abasi among the Ogiso's, Urohbo, Yoruba's, Efiks Ibibio. The Igbo nation aside from their executive and religious chiefs, also had present a society of Judges known as The Ikpe society or the leopard cult. Christian Ngozi (talk) 01:30, 21 September 2019 (UTC)[reply]

A Commons file used on this page or its Wikidata item has been nominated for deletion[edit]

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A Commons file used on this page or its Wikidata item has been nominated for deletion[edit]

The following Wikimedia Commons file used on this page or its Wikidata item has been nominated for deletion:

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Semi-protected edit request on 1 September 2020[edit]

The people are popularly known as IGBOs not Ibo Menkay (talk) 03:58, 1 September 2020 (UTC)[reply]

 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. Cannolis (talk) 04:29, 1 September 2020 (UTC)[reply]

Semi-protected edit request on 19 June 2021[edit]

Nigeria has never conducted an ethnic census so Igbos are not 18%. Stop that falsehood..Stop that lie SAINFIELDCASTRO (talk) 21:51, 19 June 2021 (UTC)[reply]

Igbo people constitute over 22% of Nigerian population size SAINFIELDCASTRO (talk) 21:52, 19 June 2021 (UTC)[reply]

 Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. ScottishFinnishRadish (talk) 21:57, 19 June 2021 (UTC)[reply]

Semi-protected edit request on 10 September 2021[edit]

Chudibiz (talk) 09:10, 10 September 2021 (UTC)[reply]

Igbos are more than 15.2% of Nigeria. They were formally estimated as 18% of Nigeria. Actually they are more than 20% of the entire Nigerian population. Establish users please correct this error.

 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. Melmann 10:56, 10 September 2021 (UTC)[reply]